The Difference Between Etsy Visits and Views

Creative Entrepreneurship | 0 comments

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After so many years of working with Etsy sellers, I’ve noticed that understanding stats is one of the significant hurdles most people face. Understanding stats goes beyond merely knowing what they say and how to read them. It extends to knowing what to do with that information once you do know. To get there, though, there are a few basics that sellers need to be clear on. (If you are a new Etsy seller especially, you will want to check this post out, too. In it, I address some of the most common Etsy concerns and hesitations.)

The distinction between visits and views is one of those basics!

You will see numbers for visits, views, orders, and revenue in your Etsy stats window.

A visit on Etsy represents a single person; views represent all the things that person looked at.

If you go into Target and look at 14 items, that is 1 visit and 14 views.

It’s important to know this so that you can see how long people are sticking around, on average. Your Etsy stats won’t necessarily hand this info to you directly, but if you see you have 5 visits and 500 views, you can guess that on average, people looked at 100 things in your shop each, and that’s awesome!! On the other hand, if you have 5 visitors and 10 views, you’ll know that on average, they only looked at 2 items each.

See how that is insightful?

You want to get visitors, of course, but seeing that they stick around is actually arguably a more critical metric. That sort of information can tell you that you are reaching the correct audience because they were interested in your style and line enough to browse… or not! This is information you can use to make decisions about cohesion or keywording.

When considering your conversion rate, you’ll also want to be using the visitor number, NOT the views number. You cannot sell to a view; you can only sell to a visitor, so the number of orders you have, divided by the number of visitors, is your conversion rate.

If you have 600 visits, 1200 views, and 8 orders, your conversion rate is 1.3%, not .66% … so you really want to understand these numbers to have the best insights! In summary, you want to be making decisions based on a 1.3% conversion rate, not .66%!

Further, if you haven’t even had 100 visitors and your conversion rate is low, you simply don’t have enough data to make decisions! That being said, you do not need a big audience in order to see success on Etsy (to generate enough data, visitors or sales).

Understanding these two numbers is key to getting a solid baseline understanding of what is really happening with your traffic.

I hope this was helpful. If so, share it so more sellers can learn!

*This post is written and published by The Merriweather Council. The Merriweather Council is not affiliated with Etsy Inc. Etsy is a trademark of Etsy Inc. We write about Etsy, from our own experiences, not for Etsy.

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Oh, hi! Welcome to The Merriweather Council. I’m Danielle and I am a maker in business and mentor to other makers in business. I teach you how to turn your crafty tendencies into profits!

Oh, I’m also really into crafts, boy bands + iced coffee. Email me anytime to say hello or send cute Backstreet Boy videos or dog pictures .. or whatever! danielle (at) merriweathercouncil.com Thanks for stopping by.

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